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the elections commission will finally say its final word on the results of the referendum. initially we were expecting this to be announced monday that there are clear delays. it is not clear are understood why. the hire elections commission could be under intense pressure from the opposition, which has been saying they need a final word or say on these allegations of fraud and irregularities that they documented throughout the two stages of the vote. toit could simply give merit the critics and what they have been saying, that this is simply arrest process and a higher elections commission and the judges were simply not prepared, that they did not have enough time to organize this a vote and deal with the result. >> still to come, supporters of hugo chavez of the venezuelan president will be back before the new year. but willie? we will have the latest. and we will tell you about the danger within the russian military forcing thousands of young men to become draft dodgers. >> recently there has been heavy downpours over many parts of sri lanka and it has given us a problem with flooding. th
to overcome it in this election. i worry about the future. not every candidate will have the particular advantages barack obama that had in his ability to raise money. >> another question from this side? >> there seems to be a growing consensus or perception that, unlike past democratic president, president obama has not left a ideological format of what it means to be a democrat. there is -- there has been a fear that with the party going so big and republicans moving to the right, there could be a battle for the soul of the party in the next four or eight years. do you see a post-obama age -- a civil war-like occasion happening? >> we just pushed the post-obama age off by four years. [laughter] >> i know. even in the next four years? >> what this president stands for -- i talked earlier about the fight we had. i was reading a book some of you may have read that was excellent about clarence darrow. he talked about some of the fights in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. during the gilded age and the progressive era. so much of the dialogue -- there were differences, but the fundam
shortly after the november presidential election. this is an hour and half. >> one of the best things about sitting across from you is that, for all of us who have been part of the institute's staff, we are wondering what you been thinking, with this experience has been like for you over the last year-and-a-half, two years. so tonight, we get to hear for the first time your reaction to the campaign. >> thank you very much. i want to thank the in boyer for the support the university has given the institute politics, including making it possible for us to hire such extraordinary people like steve edwards and been restored and all of the other people -- and ben reeseberg and all the other people. [applause] you have been wondering what i have been doing and i have been wondering what you have been doing. [laughter] >> those who were disappointed by this outcome, the democrats elated by this outcome -- given the conventional wisdom around this campaign, the president's approval ratings that were barely above 50%, often dipping below it, the unemployment around 8%, gdp growth stock of arou
ceremony in january may have to be postponed. opposition parties are demanding a new presidential election to be held should chavez failed to be sworn in on such a date. such a delay suggests he is not capable of carrying out his duties. >>> the leader of china's communist party game into office promising to narrow the gap between rich and poor. he wants to lift millions of people out of poverty. xi is expected to take over from president hu jintao in march. xinhua television reported xi squatted with villagers in their homes over the weekend and held their homes. he reportedly asked them whether they had warm blankets and enough coal for heating. the vice premiere, li keqiang, visited poor inland villages. li is the second-ranking leader in the communist party. the reports say he braved cold temperatures and snow to visit the mountainous area. >>> the chinese embassy in tokyo has dismissed a document that says some disputed islands are part of japan. japan controls the senkaku islands in the east china sea. china and taiwan claim them. japanese wire service jiji press says the chinese gov
not release him to pay off much in the last election? >> jason dick, emily goodin, thank you for being on "newsmakers." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> we will show our conversation with luke messer today again at 6:00 p.m. eastern. coast chambers of congress are in -- both chambers of congress are in. the senate is in at 1:00 eastern time. votes are scheduled at 2:00 p.m. eastern. majority leader harry reid and minority leader mcconnell had set a deadline of 3:00 p.m. when they're planning to convene a caucus meetings and update members of the parties on a possible plan for taxes and spending on the new year. will bring you live coverage of the senate on c-span2 started at 1:00 eastern. in the house, the return of 2:00 p.m. you'll be considering a number of pieces of legislation. what the live coverage of the house here and c-span. next, retiring senator kent conrad reflects on his career in congress to. it is currently senate budget committee chairman and was first elected to the senate in 1986. this
agree with you about the 2000 election. one of the things i talk about is the 2000 convention, democratic convention, i do if you remember that bill clinton came that bill clinton came down that long white corridor with a black suit, looked like high noon, gary cooper in high noon, remember? at the time of a city with george stephanopoulos watching this. i said george, i think -- out gorgeous game on. georgette the time said no, there's too much discord about president clinton still at this point. but i tended to agree with you. i think two things. number one, i think, this was a shortcoming and i think the media including us at abc news, i think the american people were ahead of us on the monica lewinsky story from the beginning to i think they figured out right quick that, in fact, he did it. they did not approve of it. they disapproved of it hardly but he was a really good president. thank you, thank you, what's going to do even when he left office his job approval ratings were quite high. the nation was doing quite well. on the other hand the clinton global initiative and
machine to take an office boy and get him elected to the senate. truman in his first term is considered the senator from prendergast shunned by the other senators. even in the second term he develops more of a national reputation but he's not an expert on any of these kind of issues. so he gets in there and from the beginning every meeting he has with people he says this is a terrible mistake. i'm not big enough, i am not smart enough. he goes on april 14th, 1st day in office and meets with reporters at the capitol, and they -- she says if you pray, pray for me now. i don't know if you've ever had this fall on you but the moves and the stars and all the other planets have fallen and one of them said good luck mr. president and he said i wish you didn't have to call me that. some of the unsung hero of your book and i know looking at the screen play awhile back about wallace, you know, this is one of the great contractor was of course of the modern american history. but if he had gotten nominated in 1944. and we are doing the but i know that it's from florida and was about to nominate him
any doubt in my mind. there are looking at the election of 2014 and 2006 to more than the people. thank you for your time. pfft host: good morning to you, elmer. what is your level of optimism heading into 2013? caller: i am kind of scared. the statement i went to bed, why do we not get in contact with george bush. i think he should be in here on the deal because it was him and that got us in this position we are in. he cannot even tolerate position said they have going on with our congress. if the people out here for us to be taking care of, if they have enough money to take over to another country the way they demonstrate, that is what we are in this position that we are in. i think we should get in contact with george bush and see if he can get us out of this. host: here is a piece in "the washington post." if there is a photo of the first couple greeting military personnel. this is the president remained largely out of sight golfing and spending time with his family. he left washington late on friday. a little progress has been made on the cliff talks, but at least the talkin
is after the election, we're facing this budget cliff, we'll have a very interesting post-election lame-duck session of congress. they will avoid the fiscal cliff, and they'll do it in a way that will produce a budget agreement either in this lame-duck session or in the first couple of months of next year. that's what i think will happen. >> there's the part of the conversation every year that drives mika crazy when i talk about how we all, in the 1990s, worked together despite some pretty tough differences. >> we didn't in 1995. we had a pretty rough '95. >> '95 was an ugly year. there were a couple of other ugly years. >> but the other ugly years we already had a modus operandi of working together. if you look at what was accomplished in '98, '99 and 2000, they were good years. the only desert year was 1999. >> i faulk specifically about 1999 because people will poke at me when i talk about how you and the republican congress worked together. i say no, you should look at 1999 because even in the worst of times, the president's people were talking to leaders of congress. >> every day.
for the senate? he said i want to show the world that a well run machine can take an office boy in the election to the senate and truman in's first term there is considered a senator from prendergast. even in his second term he develops more of a national reputation but he is not expert on any of these issues. so he gets in there and write from the beginning every meeting he has with people he says this is a terrible mistake. i'm not take enough and i'm not smart enough and april 13, his first day in office mates meets with the reporters at the capitol. he said voice if you pray for me now, i don't know a few ever had a load of hay fall on you but i feel the moon and stars and all the planets have fallen on me. good luck mr. president. truman says i wish you didn't have to come me that. host go. >> host: back to henry wallace is perhaps the unsung hero of your book and i know as oliver was saying thinking about working on a screenplay a while back about while this. this is one of the great counterfactual's of modern american history. what if wallace had gotten nominated in 1944? in your book, h
ratcratcheting up the pain. i was surprised. i thought enough after the election would be sorted out and the fiscal cliff would be a painful enough deadline they would come together. but it seems like the pain will come when we get to the dead cliff where they must absolutely deal with. it's one area where they must focus attention and create another deadline where they have to do something and potentially a larger agreement. >> susie: real quickly this has been frustrating from everybody from wall street to ceo to average american taxpayers. even the president saw that playing out. how do you seep see this playing out. will we have a deal on monday. >> it'we haven't heard them tal. but the hurdle remains in the house. 9 odds look like we'll go over for some period of time what bliss brings them back to a deal at that time is anybody's guess. >> susie: we'll be reporting more on monday. thanks a lot darren. washington bureau chief darren >> reporter: still ahead, harnessing the power of play. we'll take a look at how companies can benefit from giving their employees a little free tim
's elections committee has said it will announce on tuesday the official results off of votes on the constitution. nearly 2/3 of egyptians voted in favor of the draft charter. >> from the beginning the national salvation front said this constitution does not represent the people. this constitution is not one of national consensus, but of national division. our position is to fight and until we change this constitution and replace it with another. >> iny and, two senior policeman have been suspended in connection with the gang rape of a student on a bus in new delhi. they said they failed to carry out their duties. protests are continuing despite police crackdowns. >> undeterred by the block aids in high security, protesters took the streets in new delhi for another day. authorities shot roads and metro stations to try to keep the crowds under control. these demonstrations have taken on a momentum of their own. the protests have spread to at least five other states in india including mumbai and bang lower. -- langelor. the prime minute stir addressed the nation promising his go
. chÁvez cannot make it, there must be fresh elections. his allies are focused on his recovery. in another hint this could be a critical moment, the new street party in caracas has been cancelled. the government has called on the country to unite in prayer instead for hugo chÁvez. >> international peace negotiations in syria urging the international community to push the government and rebels into talks. without talks, they want the country could become a failed state ruled by warlords for the -- warlords. tortured and disfigured bodies have been discovered north of damascus. at least 10 people killed and 40 others wounded, seven people were killed from the same family. bombs also incur code. a short time ago as spoke to bbc but said the attacks come at a difficult time politically for iraq. >> clearly, the most at that stands out the most is the one you mentioned south of baghdad where apparently, and normal, ordinary home was blown up and seven people were killed inside. but the other attacks have been more or less standard, attacks on security forces and shiites -- shia religious proce
machine that got truman re-elected in 1940, and ed pauley. ed pauley was a california oil millionaire who said, i went into politics and realized it was cheaper to reflect new congress than buy the old one. he later gets indicted for a good reason. >> his name is on the pavilion in ucla. >> right. the -- so they decided they're going to try to surround roosevelt with all people who are hostile to wallace to convince him he can't get re-elected if wallace was on the ticket. wallace had enemies in 1941 when henry luce made the speech that the 20th center is going to be the united states century and the united states is going to dominate the world economically and politically, and wallace responsibled to that and made a famous speech that the 20th 20th century should not be the american century. it should be the century of the common man. we need a worldwide revolution in the tradition of the french. he calls for ending colonialism, ending cartels, spreading the fruits of science and technology around the world. and he had enemies. his enemies were the southern segregationist because he was
are right in between an election back in october and a potential ininauguration on january 10. he has said he wants his vice president, a one-time bus driver, to replace him. it is not clear that would happen if he died now they have to hold an election in 30 days but it is more complicated than that. if chavez dies before the john 10 inauguration, that election is run by the head of the parliament. but if he dies after january 10, it is run by the vice president so if chavez who has run venezuela for 14 years were to diet would throw the politics into up heville but it would be an additional factor whether that happens before or after january 10. it could make a difference as who will replace chavez. >>trace: thank you. at home folks across our nation are ready to ring in the new year. in baltimore, crews are ready for the fireworks display at the famous inner harbor. in mobile, alabama, the tornado has not affected the traditional moon pie celebration with 80 pounds of chocolate covered graham cracker to be served. andian necessary dean -- now janice dean looks at the weather. >> low 40'
. >> thomas mann, did the 2012 elections clarify anything? >> by all appearances, it was a status quo election, returning us to the division of power; obama in the white house, democrats in control of the senate, republicans of the house. but appearances can be deceiving, and in this case are. the most important reality of the election is that the republican effort to oppose anything and everything proposed by obama -- almost like a parliamentary party -- was not rewarded. the taking the debt ceiling hostage was not rewarded, calling the obama health care plan which was their own only a few years earlier socialism was not rewarded. that was not they have to begin to rethink themselves and, importantly, democrats will not automatically embrace the same tactics in opposition. so i think that was an important change that creates a new dynamic not that's going to solve our problems. there's going to be no sitting around the campfire in washington making nice to one another. but the possibility now exists for a real effort and a successful effort to deal with our most pressing problems. >> two fami
ratchratcheting up the pain. i was surprised. i thought enough after the election would be sorted out and the fiscal cliff would be a painful enough deadline they would come together. but it seems like the pain will come when we get to the dead cliff where they must absolutely deal with. it's one area where they must focus attention and create another deadline where they have to do something and potentially a larger agreement. >> susie: real quickly this has been frustrating from everybody from wall street to ceo to average american taxpayers. even the president saw that playing out. how do you seep see this playing out. will we have a deal on monday. >> it'swe haven't heard them talkabout optimism. but the hurdle remains in the house. 9 odds look like we'll go over for some period of time what bliss brings them back to a deal at that time is anybody's guess. >> susie: we'll be reporting more on monday. thanks a lot darren. washington bureau chief darren >> reporter: still ahead harnessing the power of play. we'll take a look at how companies can benefit from giving their employees a
whole that lives in its own bubble and things that we have seen that in the last election. they simply couldn't believe what they were saying that obama was probably going to win and that most democratic senate candidates were going to win. they were shellshocked in their own words, and if they cannot sort of accept the in critical reality, they are going to be in big trouble in the succeeding election. >> democrats became useless? >> well, they become useless and that they become the party of me too but less in that after three successive losses in the presidential elections in the 80's they kind of retool and become more friendly and many people think, and i happen to be one of them, for all but obama has excoriated as a kind of muslim and socialist that once, she's pretty much fulfiled george bush's third term in the national security matters. >> finally how does the middle class figure in to your thesis? >> the middle class figures and they are the ones that got shafted because there was a bipartisan move. clinton was president, the republicans mainly were running the congress when
and sintroduce you to the president. they looked at each other and said yes. 18 years later i got elected to congress and i called reagan's secretary and let me see if i can arrange this. they range did and -- arranged it and mom and kenny came. we went into the oval office and president reagan came over and said, i want to tell you your son is one of the brightest young congressman we have and he is going to do great things. i know you have to wait on tables for 18 years and it worked in a foundry. and danny had to shine shoes. we had those problems in my family. isn't it great we live in a country where you can achieve anything? he had had his secretary called my abbas to find out about me and my family. when i walked data that office, i would have done -- out of that office, i would have done anything for that man. she was so happy and she carried the picture until she died. her favorite actor was ronald reagan. >> a lesson for that about relationships for president is the personal touch? >> it is a big part of it but it was not just a personal touch. he had goals like the strategic de
an extraordinary job. in election season, i find it fascinating to listen to my father talk about what kind of person succeeds in politics. he believed the time for changing, and he was right for the time. it is interesting to apply his standards to the current campaign. he talks about the odds of people with money succeeding in politics and about whether objects come to play. find his standards to today, i know where i come down. i encourage you to make up your own mind. as his child, i cherish the parts were my brother and i appear on the tape. i remember walking into the office before school in the morning and visiting him in the afternoon so that we could play under his desk. it was the highlight of the day for john and me. and the delight in my father's voice shows that he felt the same way. i felt fortunate to be able to listen in on his meetings and to be able to hear his mind at work. his tone of voice, his chuckle and frustration, and most of hall, his sense of purpose. what comes through is that politics is a way of his solving problems and nothing is more rewarding than giving pa
. 18 years later i got elected to congress and i called reagan's secretary and let me see if i can arrange this. they arranged it and mom and kenny came. we parked behind the white house. we went into the oval office and president reagan came over and said, i want to tell you your son is one of the brightest young congressman we have and he is going to do great things. i know you have to wait on tables for 18 years and it worked in a foundry. and danny had to shine shoes. i know it was tough. we had those problems in my family. isn't it great we live in a country where you can achieve anything? all i could think was, how did he know this stuff? he had had his secretary call to find out about me and my family. when i walked out of that office, i would have done anything for that man. he made my mother feel so happy. she was so happy and she carried the picture until she died. her favorite actor was ronald reagan. >> a lesson for that about relationships for president is the personal touch? >> it is a big part of it but it was not just a personal touch. he had goals like the strategi
parochial. they are beyond squabbles. they have a horizon of 8 months to the next federal election in germany, for instance. europe therefore is the sick person of your. -- europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and t
the aisle. they're looking over their shoulder afraid they're going to get primaried in the next election. that makes it more important to make a deal. that is why we are here in a lame duck session in the final days of the year. it is frustrating. it should infuriate the american people who do better every day at their own job, finding ways to work with people with whom they have differences, but the important thing in these final hours is that we do get some kind of a deal. it will be a political patch. the important point here is this is not a grand bargain that will solve the issues of deficit and debt. this time bomb that the congress created was designed to deal with deficit and the debt. we won't get that right now. but we might get a plan to deal with taxes, to avoid the fiscal cliff, that's a win for the economy and the american people. >> john, it is joe johns in washington, d.c. we have heard so much about tax increases and how they're going to handle those and not so much about the spending cuts and my question to you is at the end of the day, are we going to end up essentiall
're not getting anything done. we elected, we reelected president obama because he wanted him to go on a path forward but it's not happening. you, and i think if the markets crash, it will scare a lot of people and i think and taxes will go up. i think they will point at both sides. a big problem for both parties. jon: alexis, harry truman had the famous buck stops here sign on his desk. should president obama get that out of the smithsonian or wherever it resides and take responsibility himself? >> i think the president has been showing a lot of leadership around this. i think that with the american people are going to do, if they are going to look at this in a much larger context. since the president has been in office the house republicans in particular, have been trying to hang the economy and budget deficit and around the president's neck. instead of trying to lead and figure out how to grow the economy and build a better opportunity for all americans. and so i think it is not just about the buck stopping with the president. i think president is doing all he can to really push, push the
hunt, mr. speaker. that is before he was elected -- he can represent everyone in your country, you cannot be a one-nation party. that was then. this is now. everybody knows you cannot be a one-nation prime minister. >> mr. speaker, it would not be christmas without the repeats. that is all we ever get. that is all we ever get from the honorable gentleman. done this year -- we have 6000 more private-sector jobs. we said would help with the cost of living -- we froze the casual -- the council tax. we have cut the deficit by a quarter. what have we heard from him this year? what has he had told us about what has he told us about welfare? nothing. what has he told us about his education plan? nothing. the fact is he has got absolutely nothing to offer except for the same old something for nothing culture that got us in this mess in the first place. >> a democratic society -- will the prime minister -- >> order, order. members must now come down. -- calm down. it is the questions and the answers must be heard. therefore seek assurances from the commissioner of the metropolitan police th
. and it was proven in the election, and you're going to be hearing a lot from him on that topic in the next four years. >> host: is so how did he play it in the 2012 cycle? >> guest: well, he was a big surrogate for mitt romney. he traveled all over the country. it was a terrific way to introduce him to people outside of florida. even though he's very popular in florida and had a stunning victory in the 2010 senate race -- not a win that a lot of people expected him to get when that race started, you know, he was facing this very tough candidate, charlie crist, who was a popular governor at the time -- but outside of florida his profile was much smaller. and now he's been introduced to people in all sorts of key places like iowa and north carolina -- >> host: was just there. >> guest: -- and all of these other swing states. >> host: so when it comes to marco rubio as a presidential candidate, is he going to run in 2016? >> guest: well, nobody tells you at in this stage of the game that they are running. but if you want to look for some clues, on the weekend of the book festival he finds himself
the harris county district attorney was backyard to a corner. the district attorney is elected and the county itself is conservative, has a traditional social views, views on social issues, and once this matter got to the newspaper that these two men had been arrested, they were going to challenge the constitutionality of the texas law, it became very politically difficult for the harris county district attorney's office to back off as a prosecution. they were quoted in the paper as saying, that sort of e qvc kuwaiting on the case saying it might be a bad law. we don't have any choice about what laws to enforce. the best way to get a bad law off the books is to enforce it. that's exactly what they ended up doing. it does turn out, by the way, that one of the early prosecutors in one of the lower courts in texas was herself closeted lesbian at the time. she didn't -- she could have entered a dismissed the prosecution or asked the judge to dismiss it and she did not do so. she said she was required to allow the case to proceed she didn't have any discretion in the matter. >> host: in the end th
into a political corner in this case. the district attorney is elected, elected partisan person and the county itself is quite conservative, has very traditional social views, views on social issues and once this matter got into the newspaper that these two men had been arrested and were going to challenge the constitutionality of the texas law it became very politically difficult for harris county district attorney's office to back off from prosecution. they were quoted in the paper as saying -- equivocating on the case by saying this might be a bad lot we don't have any choice about what laws to enforce and the best way to get a bad lot of all the books is to enforce it. so that is exactly what they ended up doing. it does turn out the one of the early prosecutors in one of the lower courts in texas was herself a lesbian at the time. she could have entered -- business the prosecution or asked the judge to dismiss it and she did not do so. she said she was required to allow the case to proceed and she didn't have any discretion in the matter. >> host: why don't we take a quick break. >> so th
, for those folks who do not want to work, we should send them home. mr. obama was elected, so live with it. he is the president. i want to do my fair share. if i am ok with paying a bit moe taxes to make sure our country gets out of this quagmire. god bless america. host: that was larry in massachusetts. the lead editorial this morning in the financial times -- again, that's from the financial times. michael vincent, statin island, new york. good morning. caller: good morning. pastor of one world life systems. on the darkest day of 1990 in washington, d.c., i began my ministry. that is something people don't realize, especially those who attack those who work with the indigent or support for the struggling -- or the poor. when i was back in d.c., we had dan and bob and they sat in an irish bar around the corner and worked out the tax bill in 1987, i believe the year was. that's the kind of leadership the article was just talking about. instead of the people that call up and paris at the propaganda, we really have to be practical. -- that parrot the propaganda. a house divided cannot stand.
this elected president. i've written a few pieces before i saw that, so i have some basis of research, particularly on his mother. i think when i get home from this incredible kenyan journey, onto canvas sides of the story pretty much completed and that's where the story begins interweaving these two incredibly different worlds that helped create this unique person. >> host: who came up this title? >> guest: i did. just bouncing around out of africa and then i said out of africa come out of hawaii come out of kansas come out of indignation at our chicago, out of this world. and so that's what i'm thinking. the book is two things. it's a world that created obama and then how he re-created himself. so i'm not sure if there's proportions yet. it will be important for me to get it right. perhaps even the first half of the book are not quite that much come at the main characters and even on at. and then come in the second half of the book is largely chicago in california, new york and boston thrown in sun. the likes of chi
so they can ratify the decisions that elected officials make on their behalf. putting it another way, mr. president, i think we understand that americans know that intelligence agencies sometimes have to conduct secret operations, but the american people don't expect these agencies to rely on secret law. mr. president, i think we understand that the work of the intelligence community is so extraordinarily important -- i see the distinguished chair of the committee, you know, here -- every member of our committee, every member feels that it's absolutely critical to protect the sources and methods by which the work of the intelligence community is being done, but we don't expect the public to infect just accept secret law. when you go to your laptop and you look up a law, it's public. it's public. but what i've described is a growing pattern of secret law that makes it harder for the american people to make judgments about the decisions that are being made by those in the intelligence community and i think that can undermine the confidence the public has in the important work being don
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)